Drinking Buddies is about a couple of friends that found a kind of intimacy that couples, who are in ironclad relationships for years, probably will never experience. And, also the complications of platonic love.
I’m having a platonic love with a burrito right now. It’s all the way in the kitchen, but I want to finish writing this first. Life is complicated.
Kate (Olivia Wilde) is a free spirited; one-of-the-guys type of girl working in a microbrewery with a bunch of dudes. One of them is Luke. Played by Jake Johnson, Luke is grumpy and lovable and they just get each other. They have a silent synchronicity. They have inside jokes, bust each other’s balls and snuggle in couches. It’s not hot; it’s cute. They are obviously in love. However, they are both in committed relationships. It’s all about timing.
This movie is also about beer. Lots of beer. This is a genuinely sweet take on the what ifs of the human condition.

Damn, I’m hungry. I don’t want you to think I’m a good cook. I’m not.

Kate is dating Chris (Ron Livingston), who seems to be exhausted from his bachelor years. Chris has a few years on Kate and seems to have his shit together. He’s ready to build a nest for Kate. She’s not having it. Luke is in an ironclad relationship with Jill (Anna Kendrick). She wants to set a date for their wedding, but in a casual way, no pressure, man! Luke is not having it. It’s not that he doesn’t love her; he’s just confused. He wants to provide for the family. Old fashion style.
Things get complicated when they have a double-date-weekend-getaway. There’s some drinking, skinny-dipping and inappropriate kissing. Wrench thrown. Confusion arises. Worms everywhere!

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I mean, I’m a good enough cook. It’s not like I’m giving myself food poisoning or something. Cooking is hard, man.

Joe Swanberg, known for being part of the mumblecore genre, brings about a script that proposes a different kind of romantic movie. You probably have lived this story or heard of a friend that did, so I can’t call this movie a romantic comedy. It’d be a disservice. It takes you through the puzzlement and hurdles of any other love story without a cop out. It’s a well directed — though not tawdry — precisely edited, great piece of filmmaking. You should go see it. I’m gonna tackle that burrito.