The Newsroom — TV Review

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You can’t fall in love with The Newsroom at first sight, but you can’t ignore it either. The show has a lotta heart, wit, passion and humor, but there’s no question it’s full of itself. Although the show is liberal porn, it tries not to be, but it talks down to you in a way that I can see people getting insulted by it, that being said, The Newsroom is sharply written and acted.

The Newsroom shows the behind the scenes at the Atlantis Cable News (a fictional channel name and maybe a comparison between the lost of the power of the media and the sunken continent?) and it’s focused around anchor Will (Jeff Daniels), his new EP MacKenzie (the delightful Emily Mortimer), and their boss Charlie Skinner (veteran actor Sam Waterston). ACN seems to play the role of CNN where it doesn’t pick sides.

Sorkin, who was at his best when he created the Emmy Award-winning television drama The West Wing, has been developing a behind the scenes of a news show TV drama since 2009, so even before he worked on The Social Network, the movie that got him an Oscar, he had a card up his sleeve. After months of negotiations, HBO picked up the pilot in January 2011 and finally closed the deal on a full series in September of the same year. Sorkin has been researching for The Newsroom by observing several real-world cable news programs first hand.

Although The Newsroom is very optimistic, its characters have little to offer, which makes its sanctimony tone a little too much to handle. I wouldn’t have a problem with that if I knew the characters in the show could bleed, but based on the first episode, aside from Jeff Daniels, I was left with little faith in the other archetypes. I hope its passion and anger and wit bring forth good debates and the show withstand the trials of a show that tries to be too smart for its own good, but I’m not sure The Newsroom would be back for a second season.

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